Rohingya Muslims: Isolated at Home

Hey everyone, I am finally back to blogging again. Over the summer, blogging really hasn’t been on my list of things to do. But now that the new school year has started and I’m taking an Information Processing class, blogging is full on for sure. Onward from that, today’s topic is quite unfortunate, and I’ve been hearing it on the news for quite some time  and it’s something I wish more people gave attention to. Recently, tens and thousands of the Rohingya Muslims of Myanmar have been persecuted, denied citizenship, and left stateless in their home of more than 100 years, solely because of their religion and ethnicity.

File:Map of Rohingya people in Rakhine State.png

The Rohingya people are originally from the state of Rakhine, Myanmar. They are a population of about 1 million and majority of them belong to the religion of Islam. They were stated to be the most persecuted minority in the world by the United Nations. And under the 1982 Burmese Citizenship Law, they were denied recognition of their nationality and also restricted of education, freedom to move, and jobs. And sadly, not only are they denied recognition to the world that they exist, but the kind of violence that they are going through is just heart-aching to witness and having little to nothing to do to help. Rape, killings, and even massacres have become daily occurrences for them, and villages are attacked by the military and Mogs who are the Buddhist community, almost everyday as well. And for this the UN is accusing the Myanmar government of ethnic cleansing and genocide, and in response the government says that they’re “only dealing with terrorists.”

Today more than 160,000 Rohingya Muslims have fled to Bangladesh coming with horrific stories to tell about how they’ve witnessed the murders of their families and their villages completely in flames. Many say that the military were using rifles and shot many people to death for attempting to escape and they also used rocket-propelled grenades to set fire on the villages. And after the killings, dead bodies were thrown into the rivers as if they had no value.

In Bangladesh, the Rohingya refugees have made camps on hills. Several thousands of Rohingyas have started building homes from trees, mud and raised tents using bamboo bought from the market. Everyone is hungry from the long journeys, and many local Bangladeshis are trying their best to supply them with as much food and other basic needs as possible. Local mosques have deployed to hand out donated clothes and food as well.

In conclusion, I just want to say that I in no shape or form had the intention of frightening anyone with these explicit, violent descriptions. But I think I was able to make it quite apparent that what is happening to the Rohingya Muslims is genocide and more awareness is needed to be raised. Concern is indeed about how many more refugees Bangladesh may be able to take in, as Bangladesh itself is being faced with the Monsoon floods and poverty. Hopefully our prayers will in some way or another assist them, and others who have the ability can do something for them in the near future.

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Global Issues: Women’s Rights

I’m thinking about starting a blog series like Eeman’s stories, however, mine aren’t going to be chapters for a story, but rather posts on different global issues that our world is facing today. So today, I’m going to start with women’s rights.

CCO Public Domain Image via Pixabay

I’ve always had a strong pull towards feminism and fighting for women’s rights. I’ve always been proud of being a female Muslim in a western society. And was always very protective when it came to women, and I guess I consider myself a women’s rights activist who just hasn’t been noticed yet.

Our society is facing such a huge issue, and for some odd reason, we just give a blind eye to it. I honestly want to get straight to the point. Yes, it’s true the world has evolved and women are slowly climbing up the stairs towards equality. Yes, women are in the workforce, are receiving education, and can vote. We have people like Malala Yousefzai, Hillary Clinton, Emma Watson, Michelle Obama, Angelina Jolie and so much more who are working hard to shatter the glass ceiling. Yet the problem still exists. Let me explain.

Women don’t only live in first world countries. There are still many women out there in third-world countries, who aren’t even aware of the rights they deserve. What about them? I don’t know about others, but I personally find myself to be very concerned for them.

In their societies, they’re looked as burdens from the moment they’re born, they are rushed into marriage at very young ages, have very little education, because they’re expected to stay home and clean, cook, and do everything for the male family members.

I have nothing against the opposite gender, of course, and don’t wish fro them to be lower than women either. All I think is needed, is the equality, no differences between men and women, no stereotypes. I want to see a future where a woman can go out and make a living, and a man can stay home and raise the children, without being judged by society.

CCO Public Domain Image via Pixabay

We’re slowly starting to see this in the western society, and people have no problem in accepting it. Yet for some reason, third-world countries are still living with their old customs and ways. I understand this is their cultures and way of living, it’s their societal rules, but what bothers me the most is the fact that, with all due respect to men, what is true is that women do the harder tasks,  they run the family, raise the children, and at the end of the day they receive the least amount of respect and appreciation.

I hope to see in the upcoming days, a society where women don’t have to fear men and the judgments of society. Where they can pursue the educations and careers they wish, where they can marry when they’re ready, have control over their lives, and receive the rights, respect, appreciation, and freedom that they deserve.