Rohingya Muslims: Isolated at Home

Hey everyone, I am finally back to blogging again. Over the summer, blogging really hasn’t been on my list of things to do. But now that the new school year has started and I’m taking an Information Processing class, blogging is full on for sure. Onward from that, today’s topic is quite unfortunate, and I’ve been hearing it on the news for quite some time ¬†and it’s something I wish more people gave attention to. Recently, tens and thousands of the Rohingya Muslims of Myanmar have been persecuted, denied citizenship, and left stateless in their home of more than 100 years, solely because of their religion and ethnicity.

File:Map of Rohingya people in Rakhine State.png

The Rohingya people are originally from the state of Rakhine, Myanmar. They are a population of about 1 million and majority of them belong to the religion of Islam. They were stated to be the most persecuted minority in the world by the United Nations. And under the 1982 Burmese Citizenship Law, they were denied recognition of their nationality and also restricted of education, freedom to move, and jobs. And sadly, not only are they denied recognition to the world that they exist, but the kind of violence that they are going through is just heart-aching to witness and having little to nothing to do to help. Rape, killings, and even massacres have become daily occurrences for them, and villages are attacked by the military and Mogs who are the Buddhist community, almost everyday as well. And for this the UN is accusing the Myanmar government of ethnic cleansing and genocide, and in response the government says that they’re “only dealing with terrorists.”

Today more than 160,000 Rohingya Muslims have fled to Bangladesh coming with horrific stories to tell about how they’ve witnessed the murders of their families and their villages completely in flames. Many say that the military were using rifles and shot many people to death for attempting to escape and they also used rocket-propelled grenades to set fire on the villages. And after the killings, dead bodies were thrown into the rivers as if they had no value.

In Bangladesh, the Rohingya refugees have made camps on hills. Several thousands of Rohingyas have started building homes from trees, mud and raised tents using bamboo bought from the market. Everyone is hungry from the long journeys, and many local Bangladeshis are trying their best to supply them with as much food and other basic needs as possible. Local mosques have deployed to hand out donated clothes and food as well.

In conclusion, I just want to say that I in no shape or form had the intention of frightening anyone with these explicit, violent descriptions. But I think I was able to make it quite apparent that what is happening to the Rohingya Muslims is genocide and more awareness is needed to be raised. Concern is indeed about how many more refugees Bangladesh may be able to take in, as Bangladesh itself is being faced with the Monsoon floods and poverty. Hopefully our prayers will in some way or another assist them, and others who have the ability can do something for them in the near future.

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