Connecting With Other Student Bloggers Around The World

For the Student Blogging Challenge Week 8 Activity, we were required to play a commenting game. So we connected with other students who are a part of the challenge. For the 3 blog posts I commented on, I found all 3 of them to be really relatable to myself.

The 1st post I comment on was Shahreen’s post on Bengali New Year:

Hi Shahreen, I’m glad to say we have something in common! I am also from the beautiful country of Bangladesh. Even though I have been living in Canada all my life, through my parents I have inherited our culture and traditions. I’ve been to Bangladesh twice in lifetime, and always had so much fun. Pohela Boishakh in particular is probably my favorite, and just recently the Bangladeshi community in the city I live in had a huge celebration for the Bengali New Year, and I had the honor of hosting the event! I love your post, and it most certainly got me excited when I found it!

I commented on her post because when I found out we had the same nationality, I automatically loved the post! Especially the fact that the specific celebration she was talking about was one of my favorites, and one that I just recently celebrated with the Bengali community where I live.

The 2nd post I commented on was Mohamed’s post on Arab Cultures:

Hi Mohamed, I really loved your post! I came across it through the Student Blogging Challenge. I am also Muslim, and am very proud to be a part of the religion of Peace. I also go to an Islamic school in Canada, so I am exposed to the Arabian culture a lot, even though I am from Bangladesh. A lot of the teachers at my school are Arab, and teach us the language of Arabic. For our school uniform we have to wear the abaya, and a white head-scarf. Which is why your well-written post really appealed to me!

I commented on his post, because a lot of the things he talked about were things that I encounter in my daily life, as I may not be Arab, but have friends and teachers who are. At my Islamic school, we also have a dress code that matches what he described in his post.

The 3rd and most final post I commented on was Sabrina’s post on Her Passion of becoming a Pediatrician:

Hi Sabrina, I came across your post through the Student Blogging Challenge, and it really appealed to me because a little while back I also wanted to be a Pediatrician. I always loved working with kids and wanted to be a teacher as my mother also works at a daycare, and I helped her with working on her projects and assignments for the classes she had to take, but then again my parents always wished for me to go into the medical field. So then I thought long and hard, and realized that becoming a Pediatrician was working with kids and also being a doctor. I told everyone I wanted to be one, but just recently I started liking Politics, so I changed my mind. However becoming a Pediatrician will always remain to be an option for me! Really great post, I can’t wait to read more from you!

I commented on Sabrina’s very insightful post, because we have too much in common! Really recently, I was literally determined to pursue the career of a Pediatrician. And her reasons why she wants to become one were really similar to mine. Which is why I couldn’t stop myself from commenting!

 

Beautiful Bangladesh

Today’s post is slightly on the personal side. Not completely, but it is. For those of you who probably don’t know much about me, which is probably the majority of you, I was born in a small country named Bangladesh. Now I know some of you may be like, “Ahem, can you repeat that, sorry I just didn’t know such country existed”. And I get that, I have experienced such situations many times.

You see, someone out of curiosity would ask me where I’m from, and me being an open book, I’d answer with such enthusiasm, you know saying I’m from Bangladesh and all, and then I’d get a confused and ignorant facial expression from them. Then I’d have to break it down for them, so I’d say it’s beside India or Pakistan, and they would answer like “Oh, So your Indian”? And I’d just completely lose it on the inside.

So today, I’m about to fill you in with some information about this beautiful country I like to call my motherland. Now I swear, the next time someone asks me where I’m from, expect for me to just hand you the link to this particular post. I’m about to give you all the information I can.

Public Domain image via Pixabay
Public Domain image via Pixabay
  • Bangladesh has a population of 163 million people (163,654,860) as of July 2013 making it the world’s eighth most populated country.
  • For such a large population, Bangladesh is a relatively small country, 147,570 km² (56,977 mi²), making it one of the world’s most densely populated countries.
  • The largest city and capital of Bangladesh is Dhaka. The city has an estimated population of 15 million people making it one of the largest city in the world. It is known as the “City of Mosques”.
  • In 1947, Bangladesh area was divided off from India and became the eastern area of the new country called Pakistan, the western part of which was on the other side of India. East Pakistan rebelled with a Civil war in 1971, and gained independence from the West (Pakistan) to become the country of Bangladesh.
  • The currency of Bangladesh is called the taka.
  • Over 30% of Bangladesh’s population live below the poverty line, however, the economy and standards of living have been improving over recent years.
  • Over 98% of Bangladeshis speak the official language of Bengali. Which is the language that people gave lives for, in 1952 Bangladeshis gave their lives for the right to speak their language.

  • The national animal of Bangladesh is the endangered Royal Bengal Tiger.
  • The Magpie Robin (or Doyel or Doel) is the national bird of Bangladesh.
  • The national flower of Bangladesh is the white-flowered water lily, called Shapla.
  • Jackfruit (Kathal in Bengali) is the national fruit and the Mango tree is the national tree of Bangladesh.
  • The most popular sport in Bangladesh is cricket. The national cricket team first participated in the Cricket World Cup in 1999.
  • Bangladesh is home to the world’s longest sea beach. Cox’s Bazar is an unbroken, 125 km sandy sea beach with a gentle slope.
  • Bangladesh is home to the world’s longest sea beach. Cox’s Bazar is an unbroken, 125 km sandy sea beach with a gentle slope.
  • Bangladesh is sometimes called “the playground of seasons” because it has six – not four – separate seasons.

I find that whenever Bangladesh’s name comes in the international media platform, it is because of some sort of negative reason. And that always breaks my heart because, I know how much potential beauty this country has. So hopefully this post gave you a nicer picture of my beloved motherland.